Report- Accurate tracking of birds by GPS – researchers happy!

Report- Accurate tracking of birds by GPS – researchers happy!

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Although the robin bird in North America is small enough to be seen, it travels a distance of about 4,480 km during the monsoon.
The researchers are pleased that the birds’ migration can be accurately detected with a GPS tracker.
Birds migrate during seasonal change. Birds are also said to migrate for a variety of reasons, including temperature, food, location, and mating. But, how do they go to the same place every year? What is the compass that guides them? Various confusions continue to linger. As technology has grown, researchers who have tried to answer these questions with its help have now found success.

The birds are said to be able to accurately detect migration with a GPS tracker. Where in the United States are satellite-assisted GPS trackers flying, when all previous instruments were used only to predict the approximate location of birds at a distance of about 200 km? They even indicate exactly where it is now.

In particular, emologist Emily Williams has been actively studying the migration of the robin bird for more than 3 years. Why do these birds only fly so far when other birds do not travel very long distances? The study is being carried out to find out. He said that GPS trackers are a great help to his research.

Emily Williams said the Beacon signaling device is designed to not disturb the birds, is mounted on the robin birds and monitors their every move through GPS. Adriaan Dokter, an ecologist at Cornell University, says the golden age of bird research is over. He said information for the GPS tracker would be exchanged and the bird migration would be monitored by the Across Satellite and the International Space Station.
He said it was impossible to follow the robin birds, which are so small in size, 10 years ago, adding that they could even tell where they are now and where they are flying. Martin Wikelski, who claims to have been brought down with the help of a Russian rocket, said the antenna, which was built 10 years ago for birdwatching, had some defects and had been taken from Moscow to Germany and repaired.

He said that once this antenna came into use, it would be of great help to ecologists around the world for bird research. Emily Williams said robin birds fly to Texas, about 4,480 kilometers from Alaska. He said that with this GPS tracker they will be able to know exactly why they are migrating and he is happy that the results will be released soon.

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